Yang, colleagues decipher nanoscale architecture of beetle shell

Yang, colleagues decipher nanoscale architecture of beetle shell

Calendar Icon Feb 27, 2017          RSS Feed RSS

Ruiguo Yang, assistant professor of mechanical and materials engineering, and his colleagues found a way to analyze the fibrous nanostructure of beetles. Better understanding the structure and properties of beetle exoskeletons could help scientists engineer lighter, stronger materials. (Craig Chandler/University Communication)
Ruiguo Yang, assistant professor of mechanical and materials engineering, and his colleagues found a way to analyze the fibrous nanostructure of beetles. Better understanding the structure and properties of beetle exoskeletons could help scientists engineer lighter, stronger materials. (Craig Chandler/University Communication)

Beetles wear a body armor that should weigh them down — think medieval knights and turtles. In fact, those hard shells protecting delicate wings are surprisingly light, allowing even flight.

Better understanding the structure and properties of beetle exoskeletons could help scientists engineer lighter, stronger materials. Such materials could, for example, reduce gas-guzzling drag in vehicles and airplanes and reduce the weight of armor, lightening the load for the 21st-century knight.

But revealing exoskeleton architecture at the nanoscale has proven difficult. Nebraska's Ruiguo Yang, assistant professor of mechanical and materials engineering, and his colleagues found a way to analyze the fibrous nanostructure. Their findings were featured recently on the cover of Advanced Functional Materials.