Kim's research team seeks to improve recycled concrete for construction, carbon sequestration

Calendar Icon Oct 27, 2023          RSS Feed  RSS Submit a Story

Crews remove concrete and debris from the demolition site of Cather and Pound Halls in February 2018. Nebraska researchers are working to improve recycled concrete for reuse in construction. (University Communication and Marketing)
Crews remove concrete and debris from the demolition site of Cather and Pound Halls in February 2018. Nebraska researchers are working to improve recycled concrete for reuse in construction. (University Communication and Marketing)

Nebraska Engineering researcher Seunghee Kim is one of the leaders of a University of Nebraska team studying the economic and practical feasibility of using recycled concrete as a building material and carbon sequestration source.

The project is funded by an $805,000 grant from the Department of Energy, one of 33 grants totaling $131 million awarded this year as part of its goal to achieve net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. Matching funding takes the total to more than $1 million.

More than 1.8 billion tons of concrete is used in construction every year in the United States alone, and its production is a prolific generator of carbon emissions; for every ton produced, a nearly equal amount of carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas linked to global warming, is released into the atmosphere.

“Also, we tear down lots of structures – infrastructure, buildings, so on,” said Kim, associate professor of civil and environmental engineering and one of the research team’s leaders. “Whenever we tear down, there’s a lot of waste concrete,” much of which ends up in landfills.





Submit a Story